Saturday, August 29, 2015

Black thug lives shouldn't matter

83-year-old woman assaulted during Bridgeton home invasion, police say

Don E. Woods | For NJ.comBy Don E. Woods | For NJ.com 

on August 28, 2015 at 4:43 PM, updated August 28, 2015 at 4:47 PM
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BRIDGETON — An 83-year-old woman was assaulted during a home invasion early Friday morning, according to city police.
BPD1
She was asleep in bed when the intruders dragged her from the bed to the dining room and gagged her.
During the home invasion, the three suspects demanded money from the woman and, when she told them she didn't have any, they punched her in the face.
The woman's 88-year-old husband is infirmed and was undisturbed during the incident.
Police were dispatched to the 200 block of Giles Street at 1:44 a.m. Friday, according to police.
When officers arrived, they found the woman in hysterics and suffering from multiple bruises.
The three suspects fled the residence with a purse.
The woman was taken to a local hospital for treatment.
Police describe the suspects as three black men, all wearing clothing dark clothing and all having their faces obscured. One of the suspects was approximately 5-foot-11-inches tall and with a thin build.
Anyone with information about the home invasion is asked to contact the Bridgeton Police Department by calling 856-451-0033, Crime Stoppers at 856-455-5550 or using the department's anonymous Tip411 service.

NLRB unelected rule makers will do for the service industry what they did to the auto industry in America.


Obama's Labor Board: Working For The Teamsters


Fast-food employees rally outside a McDonald's in Atlanta on May 15, 2014.  AP
Fast-food employees rally outside a McDonald's in Atlanta on May 15, 2014. AP View Enlarged Image
Business: A National Labor Relations Board ruling made Thursday is a gift to unions and a boot on the neck of independent businesses. Welcome to another chapter in President Obama's remaking of America.
Three members of the unelected five-person NLRB acted in exactly the way that unions wanted them to. They decided, against decades of history, that Browning-Ferris Industries is a "joint employer" with a temporary staffing agency that provides workers for the Houston-based waste-management company's facility in California.
The ruling makes it easier for the Teamsters to organize the California workers, something it had reportedly been unsuccessful in doing.
The unions want big businesses to be defined as joint employers with small businesses, such as Leadpoint Business Services, provider of the California workers, and franchises that operate restaurants.
They can more easily drag large corporations such as McDonald's and other fast-food companies to the bargaining table and complain to them about alleged labor violations if they are considered joint employers.
The bigger companies also have more money, making them fat targets for trial lawyers who are always looking for someone to sue.
Up until this ruling, which is likely to be reviewed by the courts, a company was considered a joint employer only when it had the authority to hire and fire workers. It needed "direct and immediate" control over them.
While union bosses celebrate the ruling, small businesses are confronting an upturned world.
Under this new definition, a company such as Browning-Ferris has less incentive to go through a small business such as Leadpoint if it's going to have all the legal exposure it would have if it had hired the workers itself. That makes subcontractors less attractive.
Franchisees could be the biggest victim of the ruling. Beth Milito, senior legal counsel for the National Federation of Independent Business, says tens of thousands of fast-food and chain restaurants "are owned and operated independently of the big corporations," and "if those corporations are suddenly responsible for the franchise employees, they'll be forced to exert more control over the franchisees."
They might even "eliminate the franchise model entirely and take direct control over the locations."
Franchises that do survive will have a new set of problems to deal with. Unionization will force them to either raise prices to keep up with an increased payroll, which hurts business, or cut employee costs through layoffs and hiring freezes, which will hurt the very people this ruling supposedly helps.
Another option is automation. Small businesses faced with bankrupting labor costs will put machines to work instead of men. And unlike men, those machines don't pay union dues. Nor can they stage walkouts or make exorbitant demands. So much for entry-level jobs.
These are factors that Obama's NLRB should have considered before it did the union bosses' bidding.
But political agendas, such as the remaking of a country, often get in the way of clear thinking.

Camden, NJ: Democrat controlled and a sanctuary city

Boarded buildings and bullet-ridden walls: Inside one of America's most dangerous cities where nearly everyone is a victim of crime


  • Camden is the most dangerous city in New Jersey, where there are nearly 2,000 violent crimes recorded every year
  • There have been a number of high-profile murders in the last two weeks, including a 25-year-old and twin brothers, 26
  • Gordon Donovan photographed some of the US's most dangerous cities but thought Camden had worst reputation 

These haunting images show the bullet-ridden walls and derelict buildings show the dark side of one of America's most dangerous neighborhoods.
Camden is the most dangerous city in New Jersey, where your chances of becoming a victim of crime are one in 13.
Bullet holes pictured here are evidence of the fact that there are nearly 2,000 violent crimes committed in this small city every year, and 57 of those are murders.
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These haunting images show the bullet-ridden walls and derelict buildings show the dark side of one of America's most dangerous neighborhoods
These haunting images show the bullet-ridden walls and derelict buildings show the dark side of one of America's most dangerous neighborhoods
Bullet holes pictured here are evidence of the fact that there are nearly 2,000 violent crimes committed in this small city every year, and 57 of those are murders 
Bullet holes pictured here are evidence of the fact that there are nearly 2,000 violent crimes committed in this small city every year, and 57 of those are murders 
 Gordon Donovan's newly published photo series paints an eerie picture of the ghost-like town where violence and drug-use are rife.
 Gordon Donovan's newly published photo series paints an eerie picture of the ghost-like town where violence and drug-use are rife.
Mr Donovan, who snapped the images on a police ride-along, said: 'I knew Camden wasn't a safe place and had just passed a few times.
Mr Donovan, who snapped the images on a police ride-along, said: 'I knew Camden wasn't a safe place and had just passed a few times.
Mr Donovan, who snapped the images on a police ride-along, said: 'I knew Camden wasn't a safe place and had just passed a few times
Mr Donovan, who snapped the images on a police ride-along, said: 'I knew Camden wasn't a safe place and had just passed a few times
Statistics often disagree over which is the most dangerous city in the USA but there is rarely a list that doesn't include Detroit, which has been torn apart by gang violence
Statistics often disagree over which is the most dangerous city in the USA but there is rarely a list that doesn't include Detroit, which has been torn apart by gang violence
In the last few weeks alone, there have been a number of high-profile and bloody murders on the city's streets.
On Sunday, a 25-year-old man, Kashif Carmickel, was found lying in the street after being shot. He later died from his injuries, reports NJ.com.
Just two days earlier, on Friday, two brothers, Markice and Maurice Harper, both 26, were shot and killed in a brutal double homicide. Their murdered bodies were discovered inside a car by an innocent passer-by, reports ABC 6 Action News
Gordon Donovan's newly published photo series paints an eerie picture of the ghost-like town where violence and drug-use are rife. 
Mr Donovan, who snapped the images on a police ride-along, said: 'I knew Camden wasn't a safe place and had just passed a few times.'The officer wanted to show me some of the areas cleaned up. I asked to take me to the places he didn't want to go to when he got a call.
'It is dangerous - there aren't any bullet holes in the walls of my local deli in New York City.
'I wasn't really afraid, more exhilarated. I was more concerned about my camera equipment when we went into some buildings.'
With a population of 77,000 Camden, despite community renewal projects, remains the most violent city in the state. 
The dilapidated buildings all over the borough are a symptom of the fact that nearly 40 per cent of people live below the poverty line.
The average income is just $13,385, well below the state and national average.
But Mr Donovan has been to many cities that claim to top the bill, but Camden is the worst and among the most rundown he has seen
But Mr Donovan has been to many cities that claim to top the bill, but Camden is the worst and among the most rundown he has seen
Statistics often disagree over which is the most dangerous city in the USA but there is rarely a list that doesn't include Detroit, which has been torn apart by gang violence.
But Mr Donovan has been to many cities that claim to top the bill, but Camden is the worst he has seen.
He added: 'I've been to some other areas like Baltimore, Cleveland and Detroit to shoot but this area has the worst reputation by far.' 
Disused offices have become 'shooting galleries' - places for heroin users to inject, while vacant homes harbor the homeless and acts as dumping ground for waste.
One photo shows an abandoned home with a make-shift letter box used by dealers to receive payment for illegal drugs.
Disused offices have become 'shooting galleries' - places for heroin users to inject, while vacant homes harbor the homeless and acts as dumping ground for waste
Disused offices have become 'shooting galleries' - places for heroin users to inject, while vacant homes harbor the homeless and acts as dumping ground for waste
One photo shows an abandoned home with a make-shift letter box used by dealers to receive payment for illegal drugs
One photo shows an abandoned home with a make-shift letter box used by dealers to receive payment for illegal drugs
In another of the stark photos showing the level of deprivation in the neighborhood, only stray cats and graffiti line the streets
In another of the stark photos showing the level of deprivation in the neighborhood, only stray cats and graffiti line the streets
Many of the houses have been boarded up, as fed-up residents flee the deprivation and the high crime rates in the New Jersey city
Many of the houses have been boarded up, as fed-up residents flee the deprivation and the high crime rates in the New Jersey city
In another only stray cats and graffiti line the streets.
Many of the houses have been boarded up, as fed-up residents flee the deprivation.
The keen photographer visited the notorious city with local law enforcement.
He added: 'I was unsure what the dangers were but I was with a police officer and it was daytime.
'The streets were pretty much empty and at night is when most of the action happens.
'The officer told me stories about squad cars being ransacked during investigations and at one point we stopped because a few panhandlers were approaching people at a traffic light.
'The police officer who took me was nostalgic about the area and enjoyed taking me out. He loved the area and wants to do right with it.'
The keen photographer was concerned about his camera equipment so he visited the notorious city with local law enforcement
The keen photographer was concerned about his camera equipment so he visited the notorious city with local law enforcement
The officer told him stories about squad cars being ransacked during investigations and at one point we stopped because a few panhandlers were approaching people at a traffic light
The officer told him stories about squad cars being ransacked during investigations and at one point we stopped because a few panhandlers were approaching people at a traffic light
The police officer who took him on the trip knew about its problems but was nostalgic about the area and enjoyed taking him out. He loved the neighbourhood and wants to do right with it
The police officer who took him on the trip knew about its problems but was nostalgic about the area and enjoyed taking him out. He loved the neighbourhood and wants to do right with it